The first time I was called Honkey, I laughed. Then I had to find out what it meant. The same went with the first time I was called Cracker. I found out that a cracker referred to a white slave owner who whipped black slaves and as such was a ‘cracker’ of the whip. I took no umbrage to either of these terms because I knew who and what I was. I was raised with the correct outlook, judge people based on their character and not their looks.

My group of friends growing up consisted of Waps, Micks, Spicks, Gooks, and Spooks. We were bomb throwers and wife beaters. We were drunks, lazy bums and outfit guys. We were friends and we could call each other all the derogatory names that are no longer allowed to be spoken out loud.

BUT! You, as an outsider, were not allowed to refer to any of us in those terms or the fight’s on. These were my friends and I earned to right to belittle them in any way I saw fit. You did not own that right and if you called my friend anyone of those derogatory names, I was going to make you pay. This was friendship 40-50 years ago.

For those youngsters reading this, bricks and stones will break my bones but words will never hurt me. Think about that.

Now-a-days, everyone is a victim or a victimizer. The mental state of people growing up in this contemporary world is so weak and unstable that being called a name is now treated as comparable to a physical attack. Words are just that, words. There is no fire and brimstone accompanying them. There is not sword or hammer hidden within them. Lighten up dude!

When I raised my two sons who went to a mix-race school, I taught them to ignore name calling. Only fight if you were physically attacked. Ignore all the bullshit. The world is overflowing with it.

When I taught recruits on the Chicago Police Department, I emphasized ignoring the invectives taught and watch the hands. Again, I stressed that people cannot hurt you with words, but concentrate on their hands. If those hands move in an aggressive manner, put that person in the hospital. Other than that, let them woof all they want.

I see careers being ruined because someone referred to another person in a derogatory name years and often decades ago that was contemporarily acceptable. Now-a-days, judgement is not predicated on the atmosphere when the slang or term was used. That person is judged on the present adoption of draconian societal rules. All names are considered attacks on the group and not just a zinger aimed at an individual.

If my friends and I were sitting at a bar enjoying a few adult beverages and some college students listened in on our conversation, they would be appalled. We would laugh and they would cringe at the descriptive terminology used. We would belittle and disparage each other to Nth degree. But no outsiders would be allowed to say an offensive word about any of us. Like the old adage goes, he’s my brother and I can beat him up, but no other person is allowed to pick on him.

I fully understand that many readers are not going to understand or accept this writing, but the elephant in the room needed to be addressed. We as a society are feeble and the political system is deliberately dividing us for political gain. Be aware, we are soon entering an era where a person’s words will wind them in jail.

Last but most important, if you are my friend, it is not because of the color of your skin. It is because that character under that skin.

To all my brothers and sisters in blue, lock and load and protect each other. And as always, stay safe.

 

 “Above all, it’s about going home at the end of the shift … “

We couldn’t agree more.

 


Larry enjoys hearing from his readers – EMAIL

View Larry Casey’s website at https://storiesofachicagopoliceofficer.com/ and review his book by the same name. It makes a great gift

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