I just listened to your song, “The Weight of the Badge.”

As soon as it was over I immediately shared it on social medial with this one comment, “Please listen to this song.”   I then listened to it another dozen times.

The lyrics you put together make a great song. To most it is just a nice song.

But, to those of us who wear the Badge it is much more.  Those words resonate with us as an everyday reality.  They carry a meaning shared by so many that when your song plays they are not only hearing it, they are living it.

They lyrics are something we live and feel. I have lived through them many times.

I am the son of a retired Deputy Sheriff. I have a brother and sister both in law enforcement. I am a Sheriff’s Sergeant. Your song brings back a waterfall of memories for me just as I think it does for most of my brothers and sisters who hear it.

 

It brings back vivid memories of Dad being injured on duty. I remember getting a call as I was leaving for work:  my brother had been involved in an on-duty crash and was on his way to the hospital.

I have been injured in numerous physical altercations with a variety of subjects.

In all of these incidents, the first thing the injured cop said to their family was, “I’m ok; I’m fine.”

I recall hearing the radio call announcing that a friend had been injured or a media report that there’s an “officer down.”

The injuries aren’t always physical. The mental toll they take isn’t visible to others. But the weight of each one accumulates and takes some cops to the breaking point.  The stress is made worse because the rest of us don’t recognize it – until it’s too late.

The “Weight of the Badge” is enormous. It comes with a huge variety of complex responsibilities, risks and rewards.

We don’t pin the Badge on for fame or fortune but for service.  When we pin that Badge on we become, at times, a counselor, a therapist, a brother/sister, a parental figure or a guardian warrior.

 

Guardian to all we serve – but a Warrior from Hell when faced with evil.

We all know what we need to do and what we signed-up for.  From day one the reality of never coming home is an ever present danger. But it is not something which consumes us.  It is always in the back of our mind but, we still look forward.

The magnitude of the Badge we carry is sometimes too much. Far too frequently we hear of an officer “buckling” and taking their own life. So far in 2019, fifty (50) officers have succumbed to suicide.  That should be an eye opener for everyone.

Watching the YouTube video (CLICK HERE), I immediately noticed the blurred, rainy images inside the sheriff’s badge. It appears to be a series of patrol cars in, what seems to be, a funeral procession.  That’s just another grim reminder of how our day could end – at any time and with no forewarning.

In closing sir, thank you.  Typically, songs tell stories that different people will relate to on different levels for different personal reasons.  Some songs bring happy or sad memories, or both.

They sometimes put the listener in a time or place other than the present and it may be the escape or break the person needs at that time.  Your song did that for me.

It took me back to being a kid and seeing my Dad leave and, thankfully, come home every day.  It took me to times and places that stirred up emotions from my Dad being hurt and seeing him in the hospital.

It did what it was supposed to, I guess.  It spoke to me.  As loud and clear as I heard your song I know you truly understand the “Weight of the Badge” because … At the end of the day, it’s all about saving just ONE life!

AMERICA

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Thank you for taking the time to read this message and allowing us to share this touching story with you.  Our editor can be contacted via email with questions or input:  Email Editor  

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